Professor Bifano: Teaching
 
   
 

EK101 University Honors College Freshman Course: Engineering Light

In this course students explore the common principles behind imaging instruments, and probe the history and future of photonics. The class includes lectures, interactive classroom activities, and laboratory exercises, and weaves optical experiments throughout the curriculum.

Hands-on experiences include construction of a light microscope, astronomical observation through Boston University's Judson B. Coit Observatory, and exploration of micrometer-scale structures using a scanning electron microscope. Students experiment with lasers and explore their use in imaging systems, and conduct measurements using advanced optical components to shape light and improve image quality.

EK130 Introduction to Engineering: Micromachines

Many manmade devices for sensing and manipulating small objects are made using processes known collectively as micromachining, and the devices so-produced are calledmicromachines.

Air-bag crash sensors, tiny cell phone switches, inkjet printer heads are examples of such micromachines.

In this course, the engineering challenges and physical principles behind micromachines are explored. Students work in clean rooms and laboratories to fabricate and test silicon structures,

The course alternates between lab and lecture sessions, both taught by Professor Bifano.

EK720 Biophotonic System Design and Prototyping

In this course, students in physics, chemistry, and engineering learn fundamentals of biophotonics sensors and systems development and prototyping.

The course provides foundational instruction and a case-study based approach to technology transfer and prototyping. Semester-long projects conducted by interdisciplinary teams involve design and prototyping based on problems introduced by practitioners and researchers identified by a regional health care consortium, CIMIT.

 

 

 
 
 
 

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Director, BU Photonics Center

Room 936, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, MA 02215

617-353-8908 | tgb@bu.edu

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